Oracle Fusion Middleware – Overview

Oracle Fusion Middleware is a collection of software packages which seats between the Operating System(s) and the end users in support of an enterprise IT system. It support interconnection of various application and tools to provide development, integration, identity management, business intelligence, collaborate services and management capabilities.   Oracle Fusion Middleware allow for management and integration of many distributed software applications.

 

Oracle Fusion Middleware contains multiple components to provide for these integration tasks to include: Web servers, application servers, content management systems and various other tools.  These all allows for many heterogeneous and distributed applications to appear as a single seamless system.   Additionally, it provides for development and management components to allow for continued system growth and adaptability to changing enterprise needs.

 

Oracle currently provides the following Fusion Middle Ware components which are listed by category:

 

Cloud Application Foundation

 

Component Description
Coherence Data Grid Oracle In-memory data grid for frequently accessed data, provides better performance than traditional RDBMS.
 GlassFish Server Open source application server.
Internet Application Server Application Server
JRockit Virtual Machine Software
 TopLink Mapping and persistence framework for JAVA development
 Tuxedo Domain (i.e. application) to include system processes, client process, application processes, servers all of which are control by single configuration file.
 Web Tier Web component tier solution includes: iplanet forward and reverse proxies, HTTP Server, and Web caching.
Traffic Director Layer 7 (application layer) load balancer
 WebLogic Server Application Server
 WebLogic Server on Oracle Database Appliance Application Server

 

 

Service Integration (SOA)

 

Component Description
SOA Suite Manage services and provide hot pluggable components for enterprise architecture.
BPEL Process Manager Business Process Execution Language provides cross platform way to design and execute business process, basically integrating process across heterogeneous it system.
Integration Adapters Provides unified connectivity architecture for heterogeneous processes thus allowing for SOA capabilities.
Business Activity Monitoring Tool to define and analyze business processes and opportunities.
B2B Tool to define Business to Business processes.
SOA Suite for healthcare integration Manage services and provide hot pluggable components for healthcare enterprise architecture.
API Manager Tool to define Application Programming Interfaces
SOA Governance Tool to transform IT system to service oriented architecture
Integration Cloud Service (ICS) Cloud service to integrate on site applications
 Service Bus Tool to connect, mediate and manage application connections.
 Human Workflow Tool to manage human project task
 Business Rules Tool to define constraints on defined rules.
 Stream Explorer Tool for analysis of events.
 Web Services Manager Management of web services processes.
 Managed File Transfer Management of file exchange to internal and external systems.
 API Catalog Collection of APIs to oracle cloud services.
 Pre-Built Integrations Pre defines AIA (Application Integration Architecture)
 WebLogic Integration Tool to integrate systems, data and processes across existing systems.

 

Business Process Management

 

Component Description
Business Process Management Tool to define and manage business processes.
Business Activity Monitoring Tool to define dashboards with hierarchies to drill down to monitor processes and services.
Business Rules Tool to define constraints on defined rules.
 Human Workflow Tool to manage human project task
Data Integration
Data Integration Tool for unified development, deploying and managing data focused applications
Data Integrator ETL (Extract, load and transform) tool to build and manage integration processes.
GoldenGate Tool for data replication between data stores.

 

Development Tools
Component Description
  Application Development Framework Java framework for building applications.
  Developer Suite Development tools for building applications.
  Enterprise Pack for Eclipse Development tools for Eclipse.
  Forms Services Development tool for forms application development
  JDeveloper Development tool focused on visual and declarative method.
  Mapviewer Development tool for maps using oracle spatial.
  User Productivity Kit Content management for development, deployment, and maintenance.
  Virtual Assembly Builder Management tool for capture and deployment based on defined metadata.
  Workshop Weblogic tool to extend eclipse development.
Enterprise Performance Management
Component Description
Performance Management Applications Management tool for monitoring and analysis of enterprise applications
 Hyperion Performance Scorecard Tool to define and monitor performance goals of enterprise applications.
 Hyperion Workforce Planning Tool for managing employee numbers, salary, and compensation efficiently.
 Hyperion Financial Management Tool for global financial management and analysis of an organization.
 Hyperion Planning Tool for budgeting and forecasting business costs.
 Hyperion Capital Asset Planning Tool for planning of capital assets and related costs.
 Hyperion Strategic Finance Tool for financial forecasting and modeling with scenario analysis.
 Hyperion Profitability and Cost Management Decision tool for insight on profitability and costs

 

Business Intelligence
Component Description
 Data Visualization Tool for visual analysis and self-service analysis of data
 Big Data Discovery Tool for visual analysis and self-service analysis of big data
 Endeca Information Discovery Tool for analysis of complex – mixed data sets.
 Essbase Plus Tool for deployment pf applications and development of analytic and performance management applications
GoldenGate Tool for data replication between data stores.
 Reports Services Tool to create reports based on oracle data stores.
 Data Integrator ETL (Extract, load and transform) tool to build and manage integration processes.
 Business Activity Monitoring Tool to define dashboards with hierarchies to drill down to monitor processes and services.
 Business Intelligence Tool for query, reporting, analysis, alerting, data integration.
 BI Publisher Tool to merger multiple data source to single reporting document.
 Crystal Ball Tool for spreadsheet-based modeling, simulations, forecasting, and optimization.
 Data Integration Tool for unified development, deploying and managing data focused applications
Systems Management
Component Description
Enterprise Manager Tool for management of hardware and software.
Web Services Manager Tool for management of web services.

 

 

Social Business & Collaboration
Component Description
WebCenter – Content, Sites, Portal, Adapters Management tools for enterprise wide IT systems
 Beehive Content collaboration and communication software.
 Social Network Tool to provide social tools and move the data between users, applications, and business processes.
Identity Management
Component Description
 Identity Management Tools to provide authentication and access controls to various applications and systems
High Availability
Component Description
 High Availability Tools to manage system uptime.
Upgrade
Component Description
  Oracle Fusion Middleware Upgrade Tools to manage upgrade and patching of Oracle Fusion Middleware

Larry Catt

OCP

Oracle Fusion Middleware – Architecture

Oracle Fusion Middleware is a collection of software packages to support an organization IT needs for mid-tier services and processes seating between server operating systems and end-users.   The mid-tier can encompass the following types of software packages: Development, Management, Content Management, Reporting, Analysis, Data Servers, Web Servers, Application Servers, and task specific Applications.   It is important to note, that not all components are require in any given Oracle Fusion Middleware implementation and that most components are implemented based on organization needs.   However, there are key components which normally always exist, such as FMW Infrastructure and WebLogic web server.   This article relates to the FMW Common Infrastructure which provides latches for all non-Java EE components to integrate with all other components.

 

FMW Common Infrastructure allows for interconnection of non-Java EE components through the concepts of farm, instances and system components.   This allows for the management of Java EE components through WebLogic domains and the management of all other components by the FMW Common Infrastructure through the use of OPMN (Oracle Process Manager and Notification) utility.  This introduces the concept of a Fusion Middleware instance, which is a set of system components which share a single parent directory and managed by the same OPMN entity.  This Fusion Middleware instance parent directory is referred to as the INSTANCE_HOME.  The Fusion Middleware instance is then registered with a WebLogic Server domain for management.

 

Thus all components of Oracle Fusion Middleware are integrated together through the use of WebLogic for Java EE components and FMW Infrastructure for non-Java EE components.   However, all components can be managed via a single management console.

 

 

Larry J Catt

OCP

Oracle Fusion Middleware – Concepts

Oracle Fusion Middleware is a collection of software packages to support an organization IT needs for mid-tier services and processes seating between server operating systems and end-users.   The mid-tier can encompass the following types of software packages: Development, Management, Content Management, Reporting, Analysis, Data Servers, Web Servers, Application Servers, and task specific Applications.   It is important to note, that not all components are require in any given Oracle Fusion Middleware implementation and that most components are implemented based on organization needs.   However, there are key components which normally always exist, such as FMW Infrastructure and WebLogic web server.   This article describes the concepts common to a FMW implementation.

 

There exist two type of components in a FMW implementation: Java Components and System Components.    Java components are all components which are Java EE applications or services and deployed via Oracle WebLogic in a domain template.   An example of a Java component is Oracle SOA Suite.    System Components are non-JAVA EE applications and services which are managed by Oracle Process Manager and Notification (OPMN) utility.  OPMN utility provides intercommunication and management for non-Java EE application services to FMW implementation.

 

FMW implementation once configured will contain a minimum of the following:

  1. Oracle WebLogic Install.
  2. At least one WebLogic domain containing:
    1. One Administration Server containing WebLogic console and FMW Control.
    2. At least one Managed Server containing components such as WebCenter or SOA Suite.
  3. One or more Oracle Instances which contain one or more system components (Oracle HTTP Server).
  4. One or more databases for metadata repository.

 

 

FMW has a flexible directory structure base on various HOME types which allow for intercommunication of each subcomponent.   FMW has 6 basic homes to include:  Middleware home, Oracle Home, Oracle Common Home, WebLogic Home, Instance Home, and Domain Home.  Each of these homes are detailed below:

  1. Middleware Home is the root directory for Oracle WebLogic Server, Oracle Home, and Oracle Common Home. It can reside on Local or remote disks via NFS.   Default name of Oracle Middleware home is /Oracle/Middleware on UNIX and \Oracle\Middleware on Windows.
  2. Oracle Home is the directory structure for a component or software suite and it is below the Middleware Home, Oracle Home can be associated with multiple Oracle Instances and WebLogic Domains. Middleware can support multiple Oracle Homes on single install.
  3. Oracle Common Home is the directory structure to support the storage of binary and library components for FMW Control and Java Required Files.   There exists only one Oracle Common Home for each FMW install.
  4. WebLogic Server Home is the directory structure for files needed by WebLogic Server. It is always at the same level as Oracle Home and under the FMW Home.
  5. Domain Home is the top level directory of a WebLogic Server administration domain. It is always separate from the directory structure of WebLogic Server Home.   It can be placed anywhere and does not need to be under FMW Home.
  6. Instance Home is the top level directory structure of a FMW Component such as SOA Suite.   It can be placed anywhere and does not need to be under FMW Home.

 

 

 

An Administration Server is the control entity for configuration of an entire domain. It updates the configuration files and manages resources for the domain.  Each domain has one administration server.   The administration Service is used through WebLogic Server Console, WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST) or a home grown console using JMX (Java Management Extension) client.

 

A Managed Server contains a system application, Web Services, or other resources. Managed Server works within a specific domain.  Managed Servers can be configured as clusters to allow for increased performance of a system application or service.

 

A Node Manage is a separate process for WebLogic Server and can perform common operations of the Managed Server. This provides increased scalability for applications and services.

 

 

 

Larry Catt

OCP

OpenJDK JVM not supported while installing Oracle Fusion Middleware on Linux 7

Various software releases will sometimes have incompatibility because the two products were released or tested at about the same time. This is the cause of Oracle Fusion Middleware 12.2.1.0.0 (FMW 12c) and
Oracle Enterprise Linux 7.2 (OEL 7). FMW 12c was thoroughly tested against OEL 6, but due to its release date collision with OEL 7, there are some validation which fail checks during the install. Resulting in the
error below:

[oracle@linux1 STAGE]$ java -Djava.io.tmpdir=/u04/tmp -jar fmw_12.2.1.1.0_infrastructure.jar -silent -ignoreSysPrereqs -responseFile /u01/STAGE/fmw.rsp
Launcher log file is /u04/tmp/OraInstall2017-07-13_08-41-06AM/launcher2017-07-13_08-41-06AM.log.
Extracting the installer . . . . . . . . . . . . Done
The OpenJDK JVM is not supported on this platform.
The log is located here: /u04/tmp/OraInstall2017-07-13_08-41-06AM/launcher2017-07-13_08-41-06AM.log.
[oracle@linux1 STAGE]$

This error is a result of FMW 12c being testing against OEL 6 with JDK 1.7, but the default JDK for OEL 7 is JDK 1.8. This article outlines a procedure to resolve this error and proceed with installation
of Oracle Fusion Middleware 12.2.1.0.0 on OEL 7 or any Linux 7 distribution.

1. Logon to OEL 7 server as the root user.

[larry@linux1 ~]$ su –
Password:
Last login: Tue Jul 13 09:44:38 EDT 2017 on pts/1
[root@linux1 ~]#

2. Determine current JAVA installed with command: java -version

[root@linux2 ~]# java -version
openjdk version “1.8.0_65”
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_65-b17)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.65-b01, mixed mode)
[root@linux2 ~]#

We will install an alternative JDK for use of FMW with one we know works, in this case that JDK is 1.7.0_79.

3. Move to a directory to install the alternative JDK. In this case we will use /opt with command: cd /opt

[root@linux2 ~]# cd /opt
[root@linux2 opt]#

4. Download the JDK 1.7.0_79 with wget command: wget –no-check-certificate –no-cookies –header “Cookie: oraclelicense=accept-securebackup-cookie” “http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz” “http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-i586.tar.gz”

[root@linux2 opt]# wget –no-check-certificate –no-cookies –header “Cookie: oraclelicense=accept-securebackup-cookie” “http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz”
–2017-07-14 14:14:46– http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz
Resolving download.oracle.com (download.oracle.com)… 70.186.31.18, 70.186.31.9
Connecting to download.oracle.com (download.oracle.com)|70.186.31.18|:80… connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 302 Moved Temporarily
Location: https://edelivery.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz [following]
–2017-07-14 14:14:47– https://edelivery.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz
Resolving edelivery.oracle.com (edelivery.oracle.com)… 104.72.8.208
Connecting to edelivery.oracle.com (edelivery.oracle.com)|104.72.8.208|:443… connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 302 Moved Temporarily
Location: https://edelivery.oracle.com/osdc-otn/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz [following]
–2017-07-14 14:14:48– https://edelivery.oracle.com/osdc-otn/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz
Reusing existing connection to edelivery.oracle.com:443.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 302 Moved Temporarily
Location: http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz?AuthParam=1473877008_9518549fbff39b6f0a026bcbd58215c9 [following]
–2017-07-14 14:14:48– http://download.oracle.com/otn-pub/java/jdk/7u79-b15/jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz?AuthParam=1473877008_9518549fbff39b6f0a026bcbd58215c9
Connecting to download.oracle.com (download.oracle.com)|70.186.31.18|:80… connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 200 OK
Length: 153512879 (146M) [application/x-gzip]
Saving to: ‘jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz’

100%[===============================================================================================>] 153,512,879 4.64MB/s in 32s

2017-07-14 14:15:20 (4.58 MB/s) – ‘jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz’ saved [153512879/153512879]

[root@linux2 opt]#

5. View the downloaded JDK with ls -l command:

[root@linux2 opt]# ls -l
total 149916
drwxr-xr-x. 4 oracle dba 43 Aug 25 14:22 app
-rw-r–r–. 1 root root 153512879 Apr 13 2015 jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz
drwxr-xr-x. 2 root root 6 Mar 26 2015 rh
[root@linux2 opt]#

6. Unpack the JDK with tar command: tar xzf ./jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz

[root@linux2 opt]# tar xzf ./jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz
[root@linux2 opt]# ls
app jdk1.7.0_79 jdk-7u79-linux-x64.tar.gz rh
[root@linux2 opt]#

7. change directory to the newly created JDK directory under /opt with cd command: cd /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/

[root@linux2 opt]# cd /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

8. Use the alternatives command to install new JDK with command:

alternatives –install /usr/bin/java java /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/java 2

9. Set the newly installed JDK as local default with command: alternatives –config java

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# alternatives –config java

There are 2 programs which provide ‘java’.

Selection Command
———————————————–
*+ 1 /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.8.0-openjdk-1.8.0.65-3.b17.el7.x86_64/jre/bin/java
2 /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/java

Enter to keep the current selection[+], or type selection number: 2
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

10. Install JAR from new JDK with command: alternatives –install /usr/bin/jar jar /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/jar 2

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# alternatives –install /usr/bin/jar jar /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/jar 2
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

11. Install javac executable from new JDK with command: alternatives –install /usr/bin/javac javac /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/javac 2

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# alternatives –install /usr/bin/javac javac /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/javac 2
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

11. Set the new JAR as the default with command: alternatives –set jar /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/jar

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# alternatives –set jar /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/jar
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

12. Set the new JAVAC executable as the default with command: alternatives –set javac /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/javac

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# alternatives –set javac /opt/jdk1.7.0_79/bin/javac
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

13. Check the default java version with command: java -version

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# java -version
java version “1.7.0_79”
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_79-b15)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 24.79-b02, mixed mode)
[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]#

14. NOTE: The Java version is now 1.7 79. Logon as the oracle software owner.

[root@linux2 STAGE]# su – oracle
Last login: Wed Jul 14 10:56:10 EDT 2017 on pts/1
[oracle@linux2 ~]$

15. Move to your FMW 12c installation directory and attempt running the installer again. The java error should be removed.

cd /u01/STAGE
java -Djava.io.tmpdir=/u04/tmp -jar fmw_12.2.1.1.0_infrastructure.jar -silent -ignoreSysPrereqs -responseFile /u01/STAGE/fmw.rsp

[root@linux2 jdk1.7.0_79]# cd /u01/STAGE
[root@linux2 STAGE]# su – oracle
Last login: Wed Jul 14 10:56:10 EDT 2017 on pts/1
[oracle@linux2 ~]$ cd /u01/STAGE
[oracle@linux2 STAGE]$ java -Djava.io.tmpdir=/u04/tmp -jar fmw_12.2.1.1.0_infrastructure.jar -silent -ignoreSysPrereqs -responseFile /u01/STAGE/fmw.rsp
Launcher log file is /u04/tmp/OraInstall2017-07-14_02-26-54PM/launcher2017-07-14_02-26-54PM.log.
Extracting the installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .java -Djava.io.tmpdir=/u04/tmp -jar fmw_12.2.1.1.0_infrastructure.jar -silent -ignoreSysPrereqs -responseFile /u01/STAGE/fmw.rsp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Done
Checking if CPU speed is above 300 MHz. Actual 3478.990 MHz Passed
Checking swap space: must be greater than 512 MB. Actual 2047 MB Passed
Checking if this platform requires a 64-bit JVM. Actual 64 Passed (64-bit not required)
Checking temp space: must be greater than 300 MB. Actual 32284 MB Passed

Preparing to launch the Oracle Universal Installer from /u04/tmp/OraInstall2017-07-14_02-26-54PM
oraInstFile: /etc/oraInst.loc

16. NOTE: JDK error is now removed.

Larry Catt, OCP

Changing command prompt in LINUX

1. Logon as the user which you which to change the prompt. NOTE: You have to add this to your .profile file to have it survive reboot. This file is normally located /home/ directory and it is a hidden file so will be preceded by a period.
2. Export a new PS1 value with the text you want: In this example I am using ‘username@machine_name promt’

$export PS1='[\u@mylinux \W ]\$’
[oracle@mylinux ~ ]$

3. This completes changing command prompt on LINUX.
Larry Catt, OCP

Determining SID(s) from Database Server

Oracle Databases implemented on Unix and Linux have a file /etc/oratab file which determines the current SID, Oracle Homes, or
active status which exist on the server, if a proper installation is done. This procedure uses the file to extract
current SID(s).

1. Logon to your Oracle Server as the Oracle software owner.

[root@linux2 ~]# su – oracle
Last login: Wed Oct 5 15:16:55 EDT 2016 on pts/2
[oracle@linux2 ~]$

2. Execute the command: egrep -E -v ‘^(#)’ /etc/oratab | awk /./ | awk -F: ‘{print $1}’

[oracle@linux2 ~]$ egrep -E -v ‘^(#)’ /etc/oratab | awk /./ | awk -F: ‘{print $1}’
cdb1
[oracle@linux2 ~]$

3. For this system there is only one database with a SID of ‘cdb1’.

Larry Catt
OCP

Determining ORACLE_HOME(s) from Database Server

Oracle Databases implemented on Unix and Linux have a file /etc/oratab file which determines the current SID, Oracle Homes, or
active status which exist on the server, if a proper installation is done. This procedure uses the file to extract
current ORACLE_HOME(s).

1. Logon to your Oracle Server as the Oracle software owner.

[root@linux2 ~]# su – oracle
Last login: Wed Oct 5 15:16:55 EDT 2016 on pts/2
[oracle@linux2 ~]$

2. Execute the command: egrep -E -v ‘^(#)’ /etc/oratab | awk /./ | awk -F: ‘{print $2}’

[oracle@linux2 ~]$ egrep -E -v ‘^(#)’ /etc/oratab | awk /./ | awk -F: ‘{print $2}’
/opt/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1
[oracle@linux2 ~]$

3. For this system there is only one database with a ORACLE_HOME of ‘/opt/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/db_1’.

Larry Catt
OCP

Determine the release of linux you are using

How determine what linux, you have installed.

Options:

1. Via release files in /etc directory.

[root@mylinux /# cat /etc/*-release
LSB_VERSION=base-4.0-amd64:base-4.0-noarch:core-4.0-amd64:core-4.0-noarch:graphics-4.0-amd64:graphics-4.0-noarch:printing-4.0-amd64:printing-4.0-noarch
Oracle Linux Server release 6.5
Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 6.5 (Santiago)
Oracle Linux Server release 6.5
[root@mylinux /]#

2. Via lsb_release command.

[root@mylinux /]# lsb_release
LSB Version: :base-4.0-amd64:base-4.0-noarch:core-4.0-amd64:core-4.0-noarch:graphics-4.0-amd64:graphics-4.0-noarch:printing-4.0-amd64:printing-4.0-noarch
[root@mylinux /]#

3. Via /proc/version file

[root@mylinux /]# cat /proc/version
Linux version 3.8.13-35.1.1.el6uek.x86_64 (mockbuild@ca-build44.us.oracle.com) (gcc version 4.4.7 20120313 (Red Hat 4.4.7-3) (GCC) ) #2 SMP Fri Jun 6 10:52:33 PDT 2014
[root@mylinux /]#

Larry Catt
OCP

Set Linux Network Adapters to startup automatically

1. Logon as the root user to your Linux Server.

[larry@linux1 ~]$ sudo su
[root@linux1 larry]#

2. Execute the command: ip -o link show | awk -F’: ‘ ‘{print “ip link set dev “$2″ up”}’ >ip_up.sh

[root@linux1 larry]# ip -o link show | awk -F’: ‘ ‘{print “ip link set dev “$2″ up”}’ >ip_up.sh
[root@linux1 larry]#

3. Change Permission to 775 on file ip_up.sh

[root@linux1 larry]# chmod 770 ip_up.sh
[root@linux1 larry]#

4. Execute file ip_up.sh

[root@linux1 larry]# ./ip_up.sh
[root@linux1 larry]#

5. Execute the command:

find /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts -name “ifcfg-*” -not -name “*bak”| awk -F’: ‘ ‘{print “perl -pi.bak -e ‘”‘”‘s/ONBOOT=no/ONBOOT=yes/g'”‘”‘ “$1}’ > net_ifcfg_update.sh

6. Change the permissions to 775 on file net_ifcfg_update.sh.

[root@linux1 ~]# chmod 775 net_ifcfg_update.sh
[root@linux1 ~]#

7. Execute file net_ifcfg_update.sh.

[root@linux1 ~]# ./net_ifcfg_update.sh
[root@linux1 ~]#

8. Now restart your linux server with the command: reboot.

[root@linux1 larry]# reboot

9. This completes changing your Network adapters to automatically start at system start.

Larry Catt, OCP

Rename LINUX Server

1. Logon as the root user to your Linux Server.

[larry@localmachine ~]$ su –
Password:
Last login: Thu Jun 11 12:29:24 EDT 2017 on pts/1
[root@localmachine ~]#

2. You must edit the file /etc/hostname to change the local machine name. You can generate a statement to update /etc/hostname with the following bash command:

cat /etc/hostname | awk -F. ‘{print “\n\n perl -pi.bak -e ‘”‘”‘s/”$1″//g'”‘”‘ /etc/hostname”}’

[root@localmachine ~]# cat /etc/hostname | awk -F. ‘{print “\n\n perl -pi.bak -e ‘”‘”‘s/”$1″//g'”‘”‘ /etc/hostname”}’

perl -pi.bak -e ‘s/localmachine//g’ /etc/hostname
[root@localmachine ~]#

3. Take the resulting string and replace the text with the name of the machine you wish for your server.

Original Perl Command output:
perl -pi.bak -e ‘s/localmachine//g’ /etc/hostname

Edited Perl Command output: (New Server Name)

perl -pi.bak -e ‘s/localmachine/linux1/g’ /etc/hostname

[root@localmachine ~]# perl -pi.bak -e ‘s/localmachine/linux1/g’ /etc/hostname
[root@localmachine ~]#

4. Reboot your Linux Server.

[root@localmachine ~]# reboot

5. Logon to your Linux Server after reboot completes and see new name of Server with command: hostname.

[larry@linux1 ~]$ su –
Password:
Last login: Thu Jun 11 14:31:50 EDT 2017 from 10.30.15.69 on pts/1
[root@linux1 ~]# hostname
linux1.localdomain
[root@linux1 ~]#

6. This completes changing LINUX Server name.

Larry Catt, OCP

Oracle tips and tricks.